News

New study reveals surprising effects of mutations in proteins

Author: Teresa L. Johnson

Jeff Peng

Predicting how mutations in proteins alter their ability to function is critical to understanding what drives health and disease in humans. A new study in Structure, Cell Press by scientists at the University of Notre Dame and their colleagues demonstrates how a minor mutation can have far-reaching effects on a protein, playing a role in the onset of different diseases.

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Study uncovers new hurdle for developing immunotherapies

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

The body’s immune system is a valiant weapon against disease, and harnessing its power through a technique called immunotherapy is at the forefront of current research to treat cancer and other diseases. That’s why an unexpected finding by Notre Dame researchers and their collaborators, related to the way two distinctively different peptide antigens react with one T-cell receptor, tosses a new wrench into the process of building better molecules to develop immunotherapies.

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University of Notre Dame to host Indiana CTSI retreat

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Mccourtney

Indiana University, Purdue University, and the University of Notre Dame invite all researchers to attend the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CTSI) retreat. The event will take place at the University of Notre Dame’s McCourtney Hall on Friday, October 26, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.

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Biophysicist awarded $1.1 million NIH grant to study role of protein dynamics in antibiotic resistance

Author: Cheryl Schairer

Jeff W. Peng

The β-lactams are a vast family of antibiotics that include the well-known penicillins; they remain the most widely administered antibiotics around the globe.  Results from the research of Jeff W. Peng, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, could reveal new strategies for coping with the expanding scope of β-lactam resistance now happening among Gram-negative pathogens.

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Notre Dame startup Structured Immunity and Medigene announce collaboration aimed at improving T cell receptor development

Author: Nick Swisher

Structured Immunity, a Notre Dame startup and biotechnology company specializing in the optimization and validation of T cell receptor (TCR) proteins, and Medigene AG, a leading biotechnology company engaged in the development of immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer, today announced a research collaboration where Structured Immunity will provide structural immunology expertise in support of Medigene’s TCR discovery activities.

 

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Baker honored by the American Cancer Society’s Coaches vs. Cancer program

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Brian Baker, Rev. John A. Zahm Professor, has received the Innovation Award from the American Cancer Society’s (ACS) local Coaches vs. Cancer program. The Innovation Award is described as being given to “an individual who demonstrates an innovative approach to treating or caring for cancer patients and their loved ones.”

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Growth in Notre Dame research and scholarship funding continues

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Notre Dame continued the steady expansion and growth of its research, scholarship and creative endeavor programs during the most recent fiscal year, recording $141.6 million in research funding. The amount is part of a trend that has led to a 75 percent increase in external research funding awarded to the University compared to 10 years ago. 

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NDnano announces 2018 Seed Grant Program recipients

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Main Building

Nine faculty members from the College of Science and College of Engineering have been awarded four grants through the Center for Nano Science and Technology (NDnano) Seed Grant Program. 

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Community research collaboration creates better system for treating trauma patients

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Trauma, or any kind of severe physical injury, continues to be today’s leading cause of death for people 46 and younger in the United States. In 2007, Dr. Scott Thomas and Dr. Mark Walsh of Memorial Hospital in South Bend were looking for a better way to treat trauma patients who arrived in the emergency room (ER) with excessive bleeding. Their search eventually led to a translational research collaboration with the W. M. Keck Center for Transgene Research at the University of Notre Dame and the development of a new method for treating trauma patients.

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New Hope for the Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Author: Sarah McCafferty

In America, more than a million people suffer from diabetic foot ulcers.

In Latin, SalvePeds means “saving feet.” 

And in SalvePeds, a new IDEA Center startup managed and marketed by a team of graduate students at the University of Notre Dame, patients may soon have a more effective option to treat diabetic foot ulcers and prevent some of the 100,000 amputations the condition necessitates every year.

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