News

New protein study broadens knowledge of molecular basis for disease

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Patricia Clark 250

Determining how proteins function on a molecular level is crucial to understanding the underlying basis for disease. Now scientists at the University of Notre Dame are one step closer to unraveling the mystery of how intrinsically disordered proteins work, according to new research published in Science.

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Researchers tackle ovarian cancer using a multidisciplinary approach

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Sharon Stack, Ann F. Dunne and Elizabeth Riley Science Director of the Harper Cancer Research Institute and professor of chemistry and biochemistry

Researchers at the Harper Cancer Research Institute, which is a collaboration between the University of Notre Dame and the Indiana University School of Medicine South Bend (IUSM-SB), are working with community partners to not only foster awareness of ovarian cancer, but to develop tests for early detection, create novel chemotherapies, and target the Holy Grail: A cure.

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New Faculty Member: Arnaldo Serrano

Author: Rebecca Hicks

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We are delighted to welcome Dr. Arnaldo Serrano to the faculty at Notre Dame as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry. At Notre Dame, Dr. Serrano plans to develop new nonlinear imaging techniques such as time-resolved nonlinear and multidimensional microscopies.

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Taylor succeeds Flynn as Head of Notre Dame California

Author: Ted Fox

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Richard E. Taylor, professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, has been named interim director of Notre Dame California. He succeeds Patrick J. Flynn, Duda Family Professor of Engineering, who served as interim director from July 2016 through June of this year. As of July 1, Flynn assumed the position of chair of the University’s Department of Computer Science and Engineering.

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New studies show molecular make-up of ovarian cancer may determine speed of new tumor growth

Author: Brandi Klingerman

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When it comes to ovarian cancer, 60 percent of patients are diagnosed in stage III, meaning the cancer has already metastasized, or spread, throughout the pelvis. Additionally, between 70 and 90 percent of those patients will be diagnosed with recurrence and although recurrent ovarian cancer is treatable, it is rarely curable. These unfortunate results are partially due to the disease’s ability to spread cancer cells and therefore efficiently penetrate other organs. To better understand how metastatic ovarian cancer spreads, Notre Dame researchers at the Harper Cancer Research Institute (HCRI) are evaluating the impact of ovarian cancer cell molecular composition and how these cells work together to invade surrounding tissue.

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Brian Blagg appointed new director of Warren Center for Drug Discovery

Author: Brian Wallheimer and Tammi Freehling

Brian Blagg

Brian Blagg, Ph.D., currently the Lester and Betty Mitscher Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Kansas, will join the University of Notre Dame as the incoming director of the Warren Family Research Center for Drug Discovery and Development and the Charles Huisking Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, according to Mary E. Galvin, William K. Warren Dean of the College of Science.

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Water discovered to form column of hydration at surface of DNA

Author: Deanna Csomo McCool

Steven Corcelli named ACS Fellow

Scientists have been aware since Watson and Crick first reported the double helix structure of DNA in 1953 that water had an important relationship with the biomolecule. But finally observing the spectroscopic signature of the column of water is a breakthrough with implications for cancer drugs and other biomedical research.

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Researchers work to improve nuclear waste recycling

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Burns 250

Researchers within ND Energy are thinking creatively about problems surrounding nuclear materials and are searching for solutions to reduce waste, decrease the cost of nuclear energy production, and increase efficiency and safety of the entire process.

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Sarah Lum wins Young Scientist Award

Author: Cliff Djajapranata

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Chemistry graduate student Sarah Lum recently won the Young Scientist Award at the MSB 2017 conference, a gathering of scientists in the Netherlands that focuses on microscale separations and bioanalysis. The Young Scientist Award was established to recognize researchers under the age of 35 in the field who set an outstanding example for other scientists. The award specifically recognizes Lum’s work on developing new forensics technology.

 

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