News » Archives » February 2014

In memoriam: Jeremiah P. Freeman, professor emeritus of chemistry and biochemistry

Author: Michael O. Garvey

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Jeremiah P. Freeman, professor emeritus of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, died Feb. 14 (Friday) after a brief illness. He was 84.

A native of Detroit and a graduate of Detroit Catholic Central High School, Freeman began a lifelong career in chemistry while working in his father’s drugstore and discovering that he could obtain a wide variety of chemicals from the store’s suppliers.

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ESTEEM project spotlight: Dr. W. Matthew Leevy

Author: Emily Sussman

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College of Science’s Professor Matt Leevy’s research is moving to commercialization stage in the market.


Medical Data Printers has recently validated a protocol for the rapid and inexpensive production of high-resolution physical plastic models derived from 3D printing of pre-clinical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) data sets (in press at J. Vis. Exp). Recent experiments indicate that the company can translate its protocol for use with clinical CT data derived from human patients. Ear/Nose/Throat (ENT) doctors could be provided with personalized, high-resolution, 3D physical models of a given patient’s head in which the airways are preserved, and on which the structure of the sinuses are completely preserved. These models will be used to practice complicated sinus surgeries ahead of an operation, with the goal of reducing overall surgical time on the patient, and reducing errors.…

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A new way to counter ovarian cancer’s drug resistance

Author: Michael Rodio

 

Standing at a microscope in her Harper Hall laboratory, Karen Cowden Dahl, adjunct assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame and assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the Indiana University School of Medicine-South Bend, is scanning through a petri dish filled with cancer cells that could represent a major step forward in ovarian cancer research.

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